Phil McCheddar

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  • Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Hi Lee,
    I switch quickly back & forth between feeling miserable and seeing the humour in life. I thought your comment was funny! 🙂
    What is an exercise ball? Maybe that would help me better than AnnieD’s cushion. I’m not looking for a soft seat for my coccyx but rather I’m looking for a good way to develop my core muscles. Having to stop myself sliding off a domed seat sounded one way of doing that. Is an exercise ball something you place on the seat of your chair and then you sit on it?
    (I’ll be offline for a couple of days but hope I’ll be back to read your reply later this week.)
    Best wishes,
    Phil

    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Hi Lee,

    “Sorry to butt in” – was that a deliberate pun?!

    Seriously, it is nice to hear from you, and thanks for your comments. Yes, I am very tempted to try the cushion AnnieD recommends. But since it’s not cheap I would like to know a bit more before investing in it. As I said, my office chair has a slight dip in the seat and so I am wondering whether the Sissel Sitfit cushion would merely fill the dip and create a flat platform to sit on. If I understand the way it works, it would only be effective if it forms a convex dome to sit on where you have to constantly use your core muscles to stop yourself sliding off.

    Best wishes to you too Lee. I hope you find a completely satisfactory solution to the problem of pain caused by sitting for long periods.

    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Hi AnnieD,
    Thanks for the plug for the cushion. I hadn’t heard of anything such as this before. I am wondering if it may help me. I need to strengthen my core muscles to compensate for my spinal fractures. I sit at a desk all day and my posture is bad. My office chair has a soft cushioned seat with a shallow crater for my buttocks. Do you think a cushion like this would only be useful when used on a firm seat? What sort of chair do you use it with? A couple of the customer reviews on Amazon hinted it isn’t so good on office chairs.
    Thanks,
    Phil

    in reply to: So tired and sad #44512
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Hi Lorna,
    I see you’re battling with a lot of issues. I know how easy it is to feel discouraged. But I was talking to a nurse yesterday about some of my health problems and she told me she meets many other people with exactly the same problems – and yet I had mistakenly thought my set of symptoms was fairly unique! Knowing there are other people out there going through the same struggles has given me a spur (even though I don’t know those people personally). Something else helped me yesterday too. I was reading some comments made by someone with a similar condition to my own and she said ‘Life is what it is’. I thought how realistic and practical! We are doing all we can to improve our respective situations and yet we still suffer pain and disability – so there is no point fretting over it as that will only add to our grief. I hope something really nice happens to you today!

    Hi Annie,
    Good to meet another beneficiary of vitamin D3! I always feel glad to get past the shortest day. I know we are likely to have some very cold and dark days in January and February too, but the shortest day is a milestone in my mind and I feel at least we’re going in the right direction when it’s past!

    To anyone else reading this thread I ought to clarify what I said about vitamin D in my previous comment above. I mentioned it has the happy side-effect of lifting your spirits. But that doesn’t apply if your body isn’t deficient in vitamin D to start with. It’s not that vitamin D makes anyone feel brighter but that the absence of vitamin D causes depression which may be remedied by taking a supplement.

    in reply to: So tired and sad #44506
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Hello Lorna,

    Recently I have often felt similar to you. I have several compression fractures in my spine and now everything involving physical movement is a big effort, even just walking around the house or getting out of a chair. I feel weary of daily life. I am very restricted in what I am able to do, and life at the moment is a struggle just to exist and keep going, without the opportunity to do the things I would like, and with little prospect of it getting better. I often find myself on the verge of tears.

    I think these cold dark evenings don’t help my mood. But I was reminded recently that a supplement of vitamin D3 is especially important in winter months, not only to strengthen your bones but it has the happy side-effect of lifting your spirits. I tried it last winter and it definitely made life seem better even though my circumstances were about the same as now. If you decide to try it yourself, don’t waste your money on ordinary vitamin D supplements but buy vitamin D3, and preferably in an oil-based gel capsule rather than a powdery tablet.

    Sincerely wishing you a brighter future.
    Phil

    in reply to: Constipation #44389
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    I have osteoporosis and several collapsed vertebrae. At times my abdominal region is so painful that I cannot exert any strain in that part of my body to try to work my bowels, and the pain automatically inhibits my intestines from propelling their contents along. I find I keep that part of my body tense and rigid in dread of the pain resulting from a thoughtless movement or posture. Consequently I end up constipated.

    I find it helpful to have several weapons in my armoury to combat constipation because if I rely on just one all the time my body habituates to it and it gradually loses its potency. So I use one type of laxative for a while and then switch to another.

    One remedy I use is a substance called sorbitol. It is a low calorie sweetener added to some food products, such as no-added-sugar jams made by a well known supermarket (starting with the letter ‘T’ and ending with ‘O’). Unlike wheat bran and ispaghula, sorbitol is not a husk from a grain/seed, so if a high fibre diet aggravates your IBS, then sorbitol may work differently and be an acceptable alternative. I tried it myself merely because I wanted to consume a huge quantity of jam without putting on weight! I particularly recommend the raspberry flavour jam made by this supermarket – I think it is better than normal jam made with sugar. It’s laxative properties are a side benefit. If you try it, I recommend you try a moderate quantity initially and build up until you get the right balance between constipation and diarrhea.

    All the best to you in dealing with this problem!

    in reply to: Taking ibprofen for shoulder impingment #43850
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Hello Sue,

    One of the main risks is damage to the lining of your stomach and eventually stomach ulcers. As Rose said above, you can reduce (but not eliminate) this side-effect by only taking ibuprofen on a full stomach. You can also reduce this effect by taking an antacid about an hour or two before each dose of ibuprofen.

    Last year I had to take ibuprofen for several weeks and my doctor prescribed Omeprazole to help protect my stomach. Omeprazole (and similar drugs such as Lansoprazole) are not available over the counter in the UK. But you can buy a drug over the counter called ranitidine (either as a generic formulation or as the brand name Zantac) which is not as good as Omeprazole but definitely better than not taking anything at all. In any event, if you start getting acid reflux or blood in your stools, stop taking ibuprofen immediately.

    A pharmacist may be able to advise you further, though in my experience if you ask the same question to different pharmacists you can end up with contradictory advice!

    in reply to: Collapsed vertebra #43205
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Dear Annie,
    Thank you so much for your good wishes. It’s really good to have camaraderie with fellow pain-sufferers.

    I’m in a much better situation now than 3 weeks ago. The pain then was worse than I have ever felt in my life. When I was lying on a bed in A&E in the hospital, I thought I would never walk again and would need to live in a care home. My pain now is much milder and I am back at work, so I can enjoy some things in life again. And I have learned to value human friendships much more than I used to. And to make the most of our short time on this earth.

    I wish you a super Christmas, Annie, and I hope all your pain and ailments will subside drastically.
    Warm regards,
    Phil

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #42267
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    A friend said a wine he tried recently was bitter and not properly fermented. Sounds like sour grapes to me.

    Banged my head on a low bridge. Would have been ok if viaduct.

    How will the second shot go in this frame of snooker? Find out after the break.

    A hangover: the wrath of grapes.

    A friend of mine believes in reincarnation. He has just been to see his solicitor to make his will. He’s going to leave all his money to himself.

    I am shocked about the local bridge being damaged. Can’t get over it.

    I know a grape who spends his time sitting in the sun. It’s his raisin d’etre.

    I just lost a game of Scrabble. Didn’t look good from the word go.

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #42052
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    I got really emotional this morning at the petrol station.
    I don’t know why, I just started filling up.

    My wife told me I’m stupid.
    So I told her she’s not the sharpest sandwich in the hamper herself!

    I took a urine test at the hospital today.
    This kleptomania is getting out of hand.

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #42007
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    You’ll never guess who I bumped into on the way to the opticians!
    Who?
    Everyone.

    Blonde humour isn’t everyone’s plate of tea.

    My dog keeps eating garlic. His bark is worse than his bite.

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #41966
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    Advice to you husbands out there:
    If your dog is barking madly at the back door to be let in, and your wife is shouting to you loudly at the front door to be let in, and you’re not sure what to do, you should let your dog in. At least when it’s got in it will stop and be content.

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #41943
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    It’s “Jamaican hairstyle day” at work tomorrow.
    I’m dreading it.

    My parents were so poor they only got married for the rice.

    I’m addicted to placebos.
    I’d give them up but it wouldn’t make any difference.

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #41906
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    The other day I sat on a hair dryer.
    That really put the wind up me.

    My doctor asked if I drank to excess.
    I said I’d drink to anything.

    My wife asked me if I thought we needed new garden furniture. I’m sitting on the fence.

    in reply to: Laughter is the Best Medicine, Part 24 #41863
    Phil McCheddar
    Participant

    My dachshund has died; it met its end sniffing round a lamp post.

    For Sale: Replica fisherman’s knife (made to scale).

    My mate came from a broken home.
    His dad was terrible at DIY.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 242 total)