BLOG – L4-5 Spinal Fusion Surgery

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This topic contains 138 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by  lc 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 139 total)
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  • #37616

    anniekat
    Participant

    Sounds as if you’re in the safest place, Steve! You will have to be more careful after your op. Give yourself time to recover?

    Annie x

    #37617

    Fritz
    Participant

    True friends forgive your mistakes, Fake friends judge you by them!

    when will somebody care that im in a world of pain rather than comment on why i was up a step ladder?

    #37618

    Navchic
    Participant

    Hi Steve,
    Is it a strange thing to say I’m glad they have you in hospital – but I mean it in a good way. What were you doing up the ladder! I read your posts from the previous days and the increasing needs for oromorph and my eyes are widening as I read. I’m not surprised your GP gave you a rollicking.
    Funny thing is, I’ve been where you are, sometimes I’m still there. Trying to be normal, rejecting the pain, seizing the moment (literally the moment) of feeling ok and doing, doing, doing. Enforced immobility after surgery, gave me some space to ‘just be’ and try to accept my limitations. But, mostly, I’m resigned now to my fate. I’m not saying you have to resign yourself to pain forever, hopefully your surgery will be a success and you’ll do great. Perhaps you need to accept that you need to accept some limitations for the time being, until you are better.
    I should say – my counsellor would be delighted if I would take this on board myself! I watch her eyes widen regularly, as I explain my latest escapade and the resultant flare up!
    Hope you can allow yourself to recover just now, if not – they probably have a chainsaw or some plumbing, or a cable that need fixing in the hospital. (Give me a shout if they do – I’m likely to come and help)
    Take care T

    #37619

    anniekat
    Participant

    On this site, we are all in variable amounts of pain, so we do understand and empathise with what you’re going through. But you need to be kinder to your body – particularly you spine. We all have moments of madness when we think we can just carry on as we did in our ‘former lives’! But pacing is so important. It’s hard but true.

    The trouble with swigging oramorph as and when you feel you want to get out and do things, is that it’s really, really addictive. So when you need it just to survive the pain, it won’t be as effective and the dose will have to be raised. It’s something to be taken sparingly or there will come a time when you will be taking huge amounts to keep your pain at bay. This is why your pain clinic and your GP hesitate to give you more of it.

    In the meantime, I hope you get lots of rest so that you are ready for your operation. But I hope you listen to the advice given to you when you leave hospital – give yourself time to get over the operation.

    annie x

    #37620

    Fritz
    Participant

    hi Navchic and Anniekat,

    obviously, you are right and I have learned the hard way.

    Fortunately, i’ve just been seen by the acute pain team who are
    changing all my meds to better suit my pain.

    I’ll be an inpatient for a while and then go straight for the op.

    Steve

    #37635

    Fritz
    Participant

    Friday 13th January 2015.

    Yesterday I wash finally visited by the acute pain team. They are a lovely pair of ladies who understand what excruciating pain is and loads of different methods and drugs to deal with it.

    After a long conversation, we decided to change to Oxycodone 20mg BD, gabapentin 150mg BD, oramorph 30mg PRN every 3 hours, 20 mg Senna BD, 5mg Diazepam QDS and IV paracetamol 1000mg QDS.

    It’s still painful whenever I wake up, but it goes quickly when the meds are on board.

    Had a frightening experience yesterday. I was lying on my back with CPAP mask in use, when something fell into my mouth and I began choking. Somebody set the alarm off and, in seconds, I was surrounded by about 20 nurses an doctors, all looking very concerned. A few back slaps and a rescuvac later, I was quickly recovering. I’m still not sure what was more frightening, choking or the look of concern on the faces of the gathered medical professionals! However, I’m still alive and kicking so that’s a positive sign.

    Getting lots of visitors every day so Im feeling loved. 🙂

    Laters,

    Steve

    #37652

    Fritz
    Participant

    Saturday 14th January.

    As I have huge difficulty walking, I needed help doing number 2s. As i am constipated, they decided to give me a potassium enema, just before my wife arrived for a visit.

    Fifteen minutes later, the inevitable happened and my wife stepped out of my cubicle to provide a little dignity. However, the use of a bed pan was not as easy as I’d hoped. whilst I had produce enough that would have got a toddler a round of applause, I still needed to get on a proper loo and get the rest out.

    One brisk ride on a commode chair later and I was on the patients toilet in blissful defecation that only a porcelain receptacle can provide.

    As I finished, I grabbed some paper and reached around for the tidy up. Something deep inside my back disagreed with this action and voiced its action by providing excruciating pain around my lower back, pelvis buttocks and left leg, causing me to fall in a naked heap on the floor.

    The nurse call system worked well and, dignity aside, I was helped back up into the chair, just as a second wave of poo decided to exit stage center. I would have felt sorry for the nurse who had to clean it but I was in too much pain to care.

    I was delivered unceremoniously back to my bed where my wife was still waiting. None the wiser.

    I dont think i’ll be using potassium enenas again any tine soon.

    Steve

    #37658

    JudeB
    Participant

    Oh, Steve! Poor you! I had never had anyone wipe my bum until I had my op, and the indignity and embarrassment was excruciating, so I can imagine exactly how you must have felt. Still, on the funny side, ‘better out, than in’ as the saying goes! Hope you’re not in so much pain now.

    #37695

    Fritz
    Participant

    Tuesday 17th February 2015

    Finally, I got some sleep.

    A very kind doctor at this hospital prescribed me some Temazepam 20mg last night. Slept all thee way through to breakfast time.

    Best doctor in the world.

    Feeling so much better today.

    Steve

    #37704

    Fritz
    Participant

    Tuesday’s 17th Feb 2015

    Head of orthopaedicss came to see me two hours after the MRI scans were done.

    My surgery has been brought forward to tomorrow afternoon.

    Same surgeon. Something showed up on the scan which worried them/ me.

    I now have the jitters!

    Steve

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  Fritz.
    #37706

    Good luck, Steve. Hope the fusion is a total success. The good thing is you don’t have long to worry about it! We’ll be thinking of you. Let us know how you are when you’re feeling up to it.
    Jan at PainSupport

    #37708

    anniekat
    Participant

    Hi Steve, This time tomorrow it will all be over and then you’ve got to give yourself plenty of time to rest and recuperate. Good luck!
    Annie x

    #37709

    JudeB
    Participant

    Wishing you well, and keeping my fingers crossed for a speedy and successful recovery. Nice that you haven’t had to wait the full term.

    #37710

    Di
    Participant

    Have been offline and family problems so haven’t been following your blog but now wishing you all the best for a successful result and a pain free recovery

    #37711

    Di
    Participant

    Sorry had to laugh at the enema story; almost as good as when they gave me picolax to prepare for a oolonoscopy and just as it started to work, the fire alarm went off. I can guarantee no amount of fire would have got me out of that toilet.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 139 total)

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