Walking sticks, What length of stick do I need ple

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  • This topic has 10 replies, 2 voices, and was last updated 15 years ago by Anonymous.
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  • #34509
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi
    I wonder if anyone of you knows what length of waliking stick I should use please. I mean where should my hand on the handle be in realtion to my body/waist. I have been given 2 adjustable walking sticks by friends. And I’m also thinking of buying an adjustable folding walking stick. And is there is a website that gives advice for this?

    #34510
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Rose, You can be assessed by a physio or OT for a stick, ask your GP to refer you. The advice I was given by the physio was to stand straight{well as straight as possible!!} with my arm straight by my side, thestick handle should be level with my wrist.

    #34511
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Thanx
    I am on waiting list for OT assesment for rail on shower wall but my name is many months away from the top of list as I’m non urgent. So eventually I will see an OT. But for now I need to know the height of stick for me (at approx 5 foot 10 inches.) Where does the stick go in relation to ones body and arm length please

    #34512
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hello Rose,

    Susan’s advice to you is correct – stand as straight as you can with arms by your side. Let someone hold the stick at the side of you so that the wrist bone is level with the handle of the stick. Adjust the stick accordingly and it will be spot on.

    I have just finished a 9 week course on a Back Pain Managment course and the physiotherapists covered this particular topic.

    Best wishes – Sheila.

    #34513
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I went to a disabled shopI know thats not politicly corectbut you know what I mean.where a salesperson,showed me,and adjusted my new stick,also it was a bit cheaper,being V.A.T.exemt.

    #34514
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    The handle of a stick should be level with the inside of your wrist.
    My mum uses a folding walking stick, she prefers it to the ones from the hospital.

    #34515
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thank you to all for your helpful replies. I’ll take up the advice

    #34516
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I asked a website who sell walking sticks and they also suggested to seek medical advise from a GP or physio. They had some good sticks. I think the address was http://www.walkingsticksonline.co.uk

    #34517
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Initially, a physio gave me a stick which was the wrong height and caused me great pain.
    So I gave up, and went off to http://www.james-smith.co.uk/ in London where I was measured with professional competence, got the right type of stick (hundreds of styles to choose from too!) and I’d recommend this shop to everyone.

    #34518
    Jane
    Spectator

    Samuel I have looked at a href=”http://www.walkingsticksonline.co.uk”>http://www.walkingsticksonline.co.uk/a> and they have a huge range of sticks and were very helpful.

    #34519
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I originally posted this under “Nordic Walking” but as the subject of walking sticks has come up I thought I would copy it into here as an alternative to normal walking sticks:

    I hope this might help some of you, though of course every one is different, and others might not get the benefits that I have. I had been walking with the aid of a walking stick with limited success (seven minutes had me dripping with sweat and needing an hours rest).

    Whilst on holiday in the lake district a number of people seeing me struggling suggested that I got myself a pair of Nordic walking sticks. These are like ski poles but adjustable and collapsible, and were developed so that distance skiers could practice in summer. They’re not cheap if you get a decent pair – I paid £55 for mine – but the difference that they have made to my walking are incredible.

    I can now walk for around twenty minutes in one go without the pain getting too bad, and with standing rests of a couple of minutes every five to ten minutes or so I can manage an hour on a good day. It takes practice to get a rhythm that suits and I find that I need a different technique for level, up-hill, and down hill. If you have them set right you rest your hands in the loops attached to the handgrips, and have your lower arms horizontal. In effect your arms take some of the effort away from the legs. You might get some funny looks, but when you explain that you are doing Nordic walking which is the latest fitness regime for distance skiers, and enables walkers to walk much further, you may well get looks of admiration and be asked where the poles can be bought. I got mine at an outdoor shop in Coniston, but would assume that they are available from any decent outdoor activity shop.

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