Pressure, Humidity and Pain

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  • #34075
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    No-one seems to be able to say for sure whether heat, rain, damp, high pressure or humidity have any effect on pain. I have decided to do my own personal experiment on this and I need a bit of advice please.

    I have bought myself an electronic weather station that measures barometric pressure, humidity, temperature and various other things and I am going to plot a pain v pressure and humidity graph over a number of months to see if there is any correlation.

    My question is – the weather station measures humidity inside my house which surely must be affected by my central heating. The BBC site gives general humidity readings for the area for outside humidity. Science says you should use one reference point.. but which do I use the BBC or my own? I spend a lot of time indoors so on these days should I use the indoor station and on the days when I am out a lot should I use the BBC? I’m not sure as then I am using 2 reference points.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    #34076
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Maxine,
    You have to remember that you cannot control exactly your humidity in you home unless you had sealed rooms and air conditioning.

    You can put more water into the air, but quite often that is not suspended as steam or dissolved in the air in vapour form. There is no question that humidity does affect aches and pains with things like rheumatism and arthritis.

    Barometric pressure again affects this sort of medical condition(I have a posting somewhere here about it, or it might be on the old Board which has bee replaced with this one. Anyway your best barometric pressures are 1013.2 Millibars at your level. The ICAN law does specify for their scientific requirements “Mean Sea Level” , but this doesn`t apply to you. Take it at your level.Your local airfield or the BBC usually give you a Pressure to set your gear up.

    Temperature also affects health as well, so I feel you are trying to use a lot of data to come up with a single solution. If I were you I would start with Temperature and pressure. Keep a record of humidity, and then if you get temperature and pressure readings giving you s specific set of readings look at humidity as a third item.

    Humidity within your home is a hard one to apply scientific data to, also remember this is YOUR pain and no one else’s, (we are all different).

    I will be most interested to see how you get on. Do keep records of all readings even if you are not using them all, as you can refer back to them later.Good luck , and its “Watch this space”

    Alastair

    #34077
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    PS.
    After saying ALL the above, I would take your humidity reading from outside. That was really the question.

    #34078
    Jan Sadler
    Keymaster

    Hi Max, the previous posting is below in:
    weather barometer pressure by Annie, 6th March 03.

    I’ve been doing this myself, for about 8 months using an excellent website for data: http://www.wunderground.com

    So far I’ve been amazed at how humid our area is, it never falls to the beneficial level of 60-65%. However, I haven’t come to any conclusions about it all except that a dry heat with no extremes of pressure is better for you if you have aches, but it certainly isn’t a cure-all if you have a mechanical back problem. I know plenty of people in Spain who still have back problems! However, they say they were worse back in England.
    Lots of luck
    Jan

    #34079
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Alistair – Thanks for your advice. I found our altitude from an ordanance survey map and have entered it into the weather station so the pressure is correct for our level. Your information on humidity and weather was interesting and thought provoking. I know I am collecting a lot of data but I don’t know what will and will not count… so I am collecting a lot knowing some of it will be redundant. The graphs are not showing much so far, but it’s early days yet and I will certainly keep you posted.

    Jan – that address is fascinating. A lot of info there. Thanks. My mum suffers from rhematoid arthritis and I have Osteo due to structural defects so it’s a bit of one and a bit of another issue in my case… She suffers worse in cold and wet conditions and spends most winters touring hotter climates – lucky thing! I am doing this for personal interest more than anything and to try find out what exactly sets me of on a pain spiral. Also to see which pressures are worse as I have been told hot weather as well as cold/ damp will set me off and therefore been advised not to have sun holidays… but seeing as I have been advised not to fly either, doesn’t look like I will have many more sunbathing holidays in warmer climates!

    Thanks for your advice and I will use outdoor humidity values for the graphs.

    #34080
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dear Maxine,
    I wish you all the best of luck with your “experiment”. I used to suffer with severe “classic” migraine and the humid conditions before a thunder storm were guaranteed to bring on a Migraine. Thank goodness I very rarely have a Migraine now (frantic touching of wood), but I now have Fibromyalgia and the same conditions seem to worsen the Fibro. However, I think this is something to do with the “ions” in the air. (is this the same as, or related to, barometric pressure?) I don’t pretend to know what ions are, or whether it is the presence of postive or negative ions that is the problem. Some years ago “ionisers” were very popular and I found that they really helped. You can still get them (there are a couple in the Argos catalogue). Does anyone know what ions are? I believe it is something to do with static electricity. Any advice would be welcome (before I spend scarce dosh on an ioniser)!!
    Good luck with your experiment.
    Josette

    #34081
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Yes Ionisers are good and you should be able to get one for under £20-00. They send out the positive electrons or Ions as you get at the seaside. A big benefit if you are an asthma sufferer is that they stop dust circulating and bring it out of the air. The problem is you have a lot of dusting to do initially.

    QVC used to sell these at a reasonable price. We have them in in most rooms. They clear cigarette smoke smells if you have visitors who does smoke. I know none of you “Health conscious Lady’s” smoke. – – – -lol

    #34082
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dear Alistair,
    Confession – I smoke!! Sorry, what is QVC? The cheapest ioniser I could find was about £40!!
    Love
    Josette

    #34083
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I would look a bit more carefully maybe . QVC is the shopping channel on TV in the UK and USA.

    I got mine for about £9-99 but that was some years ago, they are still going strong and doing a fine job

    #34084
    Josette
    Participant

    Dear Alistair,
    Thanks for the advice. I will check out QVC and see if I can get an ioniser for a reasonable price.
    Cheers
    Josette

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